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Category: Database Administration

Azure Data Studio: Reset settings

Azure Data Studio: Reset settings

I had a weird behaviour yesterday with Azure Data Studio. A tab with a SQL Query kept coming up. If I tried to close it a save-changes-dialogue popped up but then nothing happend. Even after I closed Azure Data Studio and deleted the respective file the tab was still magically reopened after a restart. Even uninstall/reinstall did not help. Finally I reported the issue on Github and a Microsoft Employee suggested dumping the profile in %appdata%.  So I renamed the profile…

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Pass Summit 2019: Conference Day 2

Pass Summit 2019: Conference Day 2

I already did a quite extensive write-up on some sessions from Conference Day 2 at PASS Summit 2019. Cybersecurity is everyone’s problem: An extract from the Keynote of Day 2 at Pass Summit Survival Techniques for the lone DBA (Pass Summit 2019 Conference Day 2) Successfully communicating with your customers (Pass Summit 2019: Conference Day 2) Here I would like to share the remaining sessions I went to. Design Strategies and Advanced Data Visualization This was quite an interesting session…

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Why I chose int rather than bigint for ID columns

Why I chose int rather than bigint for ID columns

This is my contribution to TSQL Tuesday #99: Dealer’s Choice hosted by Aaron Bertrand this month. I choose door #2 to write about T-SQL bad habits. One thing that comes to my mind immediately is how to handle id columns and which data type to choose. First of all: I don’t think there is any one-size-fits-all-approach you could use without thinking twice. My experience is based on working for a mid-sized business with fairly small sized tables which rarely have…

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SQL Server transaction log and the need for roll backs and roll forwards

SQL Server transaction log and the need for roll backs and roll forwards

A few days ago Kendra Little did a great Podcast about Write Ahead Logging in SQL Server. Key point is that all transactions are written to the transaction log first and then to the data file. This enables SQL server to fulfil the Durability requirement (one of the ACID properties of transactions). Kendra did a good job of explaining but I didn’t get her right the first time and did some research myself on roll backs and roll forwards. The…

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